Oracle has taken another step in building bridges to the open source community after relations came under strain following the acquisition of Sun Microsystems by donating the codebase for to the Apache Software Foundation.

Oracle, acquired through the purchase of Sun Microsystems and tried to sell a commercial version of the suite under the name Oracle Open Office title. It also announced plans to launch Oracle Cloud Office. Oracle's plans led to a clash with members of the community, some of whom broke off to form an offshoot project called LibreOffice and a related group, the Document Foundation.

Oracle scrapped its OpenOffice plans in April, claiming laack of interest from customers and has now made its peace with the LibreOffice developers by donating code back to the community.

"Donating to Apache gives this popular consumer software a mature, open, and well established infrastructure to continue well into the future. The Apache Software Foundation's model makes it possible for commercial and individual volunteer contributors to collaborate on open source product development," said Luke Kowalski, vice president with Oracle's Corporate Architecture Group, in a statement.

"We welcome highly-focused, emerging projects from individual contributors, as well as those with robust developer communities, global user bases, and strong corporate backing," said ASF president Jim Jagielski in a statement. "Today's submission of the code base is testament to our track record for successfully incubating highly-established, well-respected projects such as Apache SpamAssassin and Apache Subversion."

Jagielski has also been proposed to serve as a mentor for as it becomes an incubation project, or "podling."

IBM also released a statement Wednesday, saying it would strongly support the incubation process.

While Oracle previously said it would no longer actively manage and planned to transition it to a "purely community-based open-source project," the chosen home was not made public until now.

The Document Foundation hailed Oracle's move in a blog post Wednesday, albeit with some caveats.

"It is great to see key user features released in a form that can be included into LibreOffice," it stated. "The Document Foundation would welcome the reuniting of the and LibreOffice projects into a single community of equals in the wake of the departure of Oracle."

But that process won't be automatic, it added.

"The step Oracle has taken today was no doubt taken in good faith, but does not appear to directly achieve this goal. The Apache community, which we respect enormously, has very different expectations and norms -- licensing, membership and more -- to the existing and LibreOffice projects."

The Document Foundation is willing to begin talks with ASF, it added. "We all want to offer corporate and individual users worldwide the best free office suite for enterprise and personal productivity."