Everybody's talkin' at me
But I don't hear a word they're sayin'
Only the echoes of my mind

These lyrics, made famous by Harry Nilsson in his 1969 version, are currently doing the rounds in an advert by a technology vendor about "moving to the cloud" (don't even get me started!) - but they did make me think about the use or misuse of certain words and phrases.

You see, I got caught up in a number of seemingly semantic debates recently thanks to my apparent poor choice of words. What I found interesting though, was that I was actually using words and phrases that have become increasingly common in the modern business and technology narrative. I'm going to share them with you and see what you think.

The first, and the one that caused the most immediate response, concerned the "increasing pace of technology change" and the question was straightforward - is technology really moving any faster than before? David Moschella from the Leading Edge Forum said recently that "the time it takes for a new technology to be adopted by 50% of US households has long been a metric for cross-technology comparisons. By that measure both radios (8 years) and black-and-white TV (9 years) reached the 50% threshold much faster than PCs (17 years) or mobile phones (15 years)". So is it really about speed or simply the fact that there is just so much technology out there that everything just feels faster? There are so many new things (apps, devices, solutions) coming at us from so many different directions that the volume can be overwhelming.

The second discussion focused on term "Digital Transformation". Yes I know, it's used everywhere but I'm convinced that very few people actually mean it when they say it. You see, to transform actually means an "irrevocable change in form, appearance, or structure; essentially a metamorphosis" - and the key point here is the irrevocable change. Far too many organizations talk about 'transformation' when what they really just mean is 'change'. They don't actually want to be anything new - they just want to do a few things differently to satisfy investors, markets or their perception of customer needs. Very often it's just lipstick on a pig. Not to say there's anything wrong with that. Indeed many organisations would benefit from digitising many of their operations and processes to improve efficiency, reduce cost and actually engage with some customers, but that's not transformation.

Finally there's the old chestnut: "disruption". Well this column is called "The Disruptive CIO", but whenever I hear the word, I immediately wonder what you are trying to disrupt and more importantly - why? Earlier this year the American-born entrepreneur and investor Julie Meyer commented that this is "the era of design; not disruption" and in that simple phrase she highlighted the positive rather than negative aspects of disruption. Too often we laud the displacement or destruction of an activity as it becomes disrupted rather than the development or improvement of something - which I consider to be positive disruption.

So there you have it. As the Bee Gees said - "It's only words..." - but next time I'll be choosing them a bit more wisely.